Why would a Joint Stop Cracking



  • I have cracked my neck for years by just simply turning my neck(without force) in a forceful way…..a few years ago , I use to twist and get multiple deep cracks all at once....now I cant crack it anymore....why would that be?


  • Community Lead

    Mhillqt, it does not seem your neck crackability did vanish overnight. I believe this to be a long process.

    You do mention "a few years". I assume you stopped cracking your neck a few years ago and kinda "forgot about it" and thus unlearned cracking your neck. Now after not cracking for "a few years" you can't crack it anymore. Is that a correct reconstruction of past events?

    The cause of Jointcracktitis labeled Hypermobile Joints / Lax liagments suggests strengthening your joint liagments as treatment.

    The treatment on trial Strengthening joint liagments suggests simply not cracking a joint for an unspecified period of time should rebuild the joint liagments slowly thus removing the unnatural hypermobility and joint flexibility which are needed to crack any given joint.

    Why did you stop back then? Was it hard for your to stop? Did you feel any compulsion or neck tension / discomfort / pressure which you ignored to keep not cracking your neck? Did you crack your neck often before you stopped? For how many months / years did you crack your neck before stopping?

    Take a look at my reverse theory on How to train a new joint to crack which should also work on old joints which you unlearned to understand the opposite viewpoint.



  • I sometimes wish I could train my neck to stop cracking.. its seriously annoying sometimes lol



  • I wish i could stop cracking my neck intentionally. I don't really feel a tug unless i put my neck into certain positions or move it in a certain way.



  • JC: The treatment on trial Strengthening joint liagments suggests simply not cracking a joint for an unspecified period of time should rebuild the joint liagments slowly thus removing the unnatural hypermobility and joint flexibility which are needed to crack any given joint.

    Rebuild the joints ligaments? Unnatural Hypermobility?
    Your saying: be less mobile w the joint so the ligament becomes LESS flexible and more stiff.
    That would seem counter productive and a recipe for injury:

    when a stiff or tight ligament is pushed past its normal ROM it will sprain and inflame and Hurt.

    Increased ROM/mobility is a good thing.

    Hyperflexability is a good thing
    Joints can be hyperflexible and strong
    STRONGER even
    Not mobilizing joints will make them weak and tight and injury prone.

    Example of hypermobility and strengh:



  • Note that he has been practicing for 11 years.

    Don't just try and do these stretches .



  • i like the phrase "practicing for 11 years" lol, it's an art form :)



  • Or practicing could be referring to a constant activity that you partake in.



  • oh yeah, doesn't it depend on how you spell it?



  • Urm….think so.

    Practice - as in you do something.
    Practise - isn't that like a surgery?



  • probably lol



  • Yep must be.



  • sorted 8)



  • Or check in dictionary to make sure.



  • @Mhillqt:

    I have cracked my neck for years by just simply turning my neck(without force) in a forceful way…..a few years ago , I use to twist and get multiple deep cracks all at once....now I cant crack it anymore....why would that be?

    lack of "practice"?



  • Yep - practise.


  • Community Lead

    @MasterCracker said:

    Rebuild the joints ligaments? Unnatural Hypermobility?
    Your saying: be less mobile w the joint so the ligament becomes LESS flexible and more stiff.
    That would seem counter productive and a recipe for injury:

    when a stiff or tight ligament is pushed past its normal ROM it will sprain and inflame and Hurt.

    Increased ROM/mobility is a good thing.

    Hyperflexability is a good thing
    Joints can be hyperflexible and strong
    STRONGER even
    Not mobilizing joints will make them weak and tight and injury prone.

    The video is indeed interesting. However, I do not agree this level of hypermobility is healthy.

    I did not mean that you should aim for stiff joints, which is clearly unhealthy, too. "Hypermobility" by its very name implies the mobility is "above" normal. I would thus personally aim for "normal" mobility.
    Last time I checked hypermobile joints are not healthy, also see What Are Hypermobile Joints?


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